Revisiting The Normal

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The Two Wild Card Teams Have Advanced To The World Series.

In the year 2008, things seemed a bit simpler. The Philadelphia Phillies owned the best record in the National League and went on to win the NLDS, the NLCS, and then the World Series, all convincingly. And then the tides began to turn in 2012. All of the sudden, the field of four became five. The Wild-Card team, instead of waiting patiently with the rest of the league, had to play a game to decide their fate against another contender. And while many cried out that it unfairly punishes the teams who normally got a free pass into the Divisional Series, something different happened this time around.  Continue reading

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The Panic Button

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This was the team that made D.C. dream. We cheered with them, cried with them, and sung “Take on Me” with them. 2012 was an incredible year for the Nationals.
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Murphy’s Law Strikes Again, Takes Harper

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Less than a week ago, Harper left the game for not hustling enough in Matt Williams’ opinion during a routine groundout. The Nationals eventually lost.

Six days later the Nationals lead by two against the Padres. Bases loaded. Harper hit one deep into right, off the scoreboard. The runners scored, and after his briefing with Matt Williams, Harper wanted a triple. He slid headfirst into third, safe.

But when the next inning began, McClouth replaced Harper in left field. Fans assumed he had just jammed his thumb, and would come back soon. But on Sunday, the Nationals announced he would go on the fifteen-day DL.

Where have we heard this story before?

Oh, wait, we all know. Opening Day, with Ramos. Against the Braves on April 11, with Zimmerman. Fister in his second to last spring training game.

Lady luck has not smiled upon the Nationals with injuries so far this season. Starters have already combined for more than roughly 43 games lost this season, all big blows.

Many things with the ability to go wrong went wrong. Harper sliding into third. Zimmerman with second. Ramos on a foul ball. Fister on a pitch.

But here’s the good news.

The Nats have won 56 percent of their games without Ramos’ big bat, and have gone 7-6 against two very good teams after the Braves series without Zimmerman. Desmond & Werth are stepping it up while Espinosa, LaRoche, Rendon and Lobaton continue to hit. Plus, the time left on the DL remaining for Fister runs out soon, and Zimmerman and Ramos can both come back by mid-late May.

Nats est. DL time left (C/O NatsWX)

Nats est. DL time left (C/O NatsWX)

Harper’s sprain hopefully won’t mean ligamental damage, and the Nats may pick up where they left off very soon.

First Pitch at a Nationals game, NL Preview

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A few weeks ago, MASN announced VIA Twitter a big contest. You had to answer the question “Why should you throw out the first pitch on April 5th?” – the most creative answer would get to throw out the first pitch, on April 5th.
I entered with a video of me playing the guitar and a slideshow, covering “Take on Me” by A-ha, with lyrics including

“Please let me… (See you later)
Throw that pitch (See you later)
I would probably… Throw it better than John Walllllllll!

Unbelievably, a couple days ago, I got a Twitter message from MASN, letting me know I would be the starter on April 5th. As you can probably guess, I was pretty happy.
After spending the next couple days perfecting my windup and getting my arm loose, I got to Nationals Park. I was greeted by the woman who ran the contest, Olivia, and a member of the Nats PR Department, Julia. They took me down onto the field, where I watched the Braves finish batting practice and hung out.

After what felt like twenty minutes but what was really an hour, I was called onto the mound to throw my pitch. Here was the result.

All in all, even though the Nats lost 6-2, it was an incredible experience. Thank you so much to MASN and Twitter for giving me this incredible opportunity.

Note: I will not be previewing the NL or the Nationals this year. You all know what I think will happen, but for a quickie: 

NL WEST: Dodgers

NL CENTRAL: Cardinals

NL EAST:  Nats

WILD CARD: Braves, Pirates

NLDS: Dodgers over Pirates, Nats over Cardinals

NLCS: Nats over Dodgers

World Series: Nats over A’s.

 

The baseball offseason in review

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There are quite a few holidays in the good ol’ U.S.A. Christmas, July 4th, Labor Day, Presidents Day, Easter, Hanukkah, and my personal favorite after Hanukkah: Opening Day. However, there is one more I didn’t list there. The day that pitchers and catchers report.

The month is February, and the days are short, gray and cold. But you know, that somewhere in Southern Florida or Arizona, the boys of summer are getting ready. Maybe they’re just catching up on what happened in those long months or sharing glory from the World Series, or doing basic drills. But they’re back in uniform, in the heat, and everyone is optimistic. That will change for most teams, but this is the most hopeful day. So, as baseball starts up again, we have to look back at the offseason.

The first thing was managerial positions, the most important thing in my opinion. Former players like Matt Williams & Brad Ausmus both got the most appealing jobs, for the Nationals and Tigers. Lloyd McClendon, Bryan Price and Rick Rentaria all joined the Mariners, Reds and Cubs, respectively.

Back in November, which feels like forever ago at this point, the first truly major name switched teams. Tim Hudson left the Atlanta Braves for the Giants on a two year deal.

However, the real stuff didn’t start for another few days. This was one of the most unexpected deals, with Prince Fielder being traded to the Rangers for cash and Ian Kinsler.

This shocked the baseball world in ways more than one. However, I feel like I said something about this a while back…

After this, the bigger deals started. Jhonny Peralta went to the Cardinals, and before you could say that “The Cardinals are the Yankees of the NL!” The Yankees made a splash and a half by signing Jacoby Elisbury and Carlos Beltran, creating a starting outfield with a combined age of 96 and 3 other outfielders including Ichiro Suzuki and Alfonso Soriano. Sheesh.

This is where it gets interesting for Nats fans. For barely anything unless you are a citizen of Natstown, The Nats acquired Doug Fister for prospect Robbie Ray and second baseman/utility man Steve Lombardozzi. Even more interestingly, the deal was reported by a high schooler.

Next, a confusing three-team deal sent Mark Trumbo to the D-Backs. The next day, the Nats traded for Jerry Blevins, a lefty reliever. The day right after that, Nate McClouth made the cross-beltway journey to join the Nats as a utility man. Right after, Mike Napoli resigned with the Red Sox, and beards everywhere rejoiced. However, the biggest deal of the offseason was yet to come. The Seattle Mariners somehow got their hands on Robinson Cano, for ten years and $240 million.

Trying to replace the big bat that Helton provided, Morneau decided that he would spend the next two years in Colorado. The Giants then added Michael Morse. The final big deal before the new year was Sin Soo Choo signing with the Rangers for seven years. Jamey Carroll came back to Natstown, again, except he’ll start (in all likelihood) in Syracuse. Right before MLB approved instant replay, A-Rod was suspended, and it was announced he would miss all of the 2014 season.

Coincidentally, the final “really big deal” happened when the Yankees spent the A-Rod money on Masahiro Tanaka signed with the Yankees.

The final relatively important deals were made on January 26th, when Matt Garza signed with the Brewers.

The only big names that remain are Nelson Cruz, A.J. Burnett, Ervin Santana and Ubaldo Jimenez.

So, if there’s anything I missed, I apologize. It’s pretty hard to put an entire offseason into 700 words.

But everything is in place for an awesome season. What will be a bust? What will work? What was stupid? What was smart? Let me know in the comments. In the meantime, see you on Opening Day!

Rotations, Rotations – The odd reason the Nats have the best rotation in baseball

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On opening day, there were no questions about the rotation. Now, there are, and they aren't that bad.

On opening day, there were no questions about the rotation for the Nats. Now, there are, and they aren’t that bad.

Ever since the end of the steroid era, pitching has been the key element of most teams. If they haven’t developed their own ace rotation, they’ve signed one. And at this moment, it’s seeming like they’re only getting more important and bigger contracts.

Clayton Kershaw is going to be payed roughly $147,000 dollars per inning he pitches for the next seven years. Justin Verlander is commanding 180 million for the next five or six years. Felix Hernandez has also gotten a huge seven 7 year deal. Rookies like Jose Fernandez, Matt Harvey, Michael Wacha and players before their fifth year or not free agents yet like Stephen Strasburg & Jordan Zimmermann are expected to get about as much. Unfortunately, one pitcher does not win a world series.

The four men behind the ace are just as important, if not more. If you only had one reliable winning pitcher, you would win around 1/5 of your games. Having three good pitchers has always been considered acceptable. However, baseball has probably never seen a time like this in which the rotations are so strong for so many teams.

But who’s rotation is the best heading into this season?

While I love what the Red Sox, Tigers, Dodgers, A’s and Cardinals have, I think that it is the Nats. And not for the reason you may think.

As a Nationals fan last year, I learned something very important. There is a need for more than five pitchers in a rotation. You need that number six and seven as much as you need your ace. Last year, the Nats were supposed to be dominant with everything. However, they surprised everyone, starting the year in a slump and with really only two reliable pitchers. While they finished off better than they started, it was an annoying year. Strasburg was hurt for about a month, and Ross Detwiler barely played half a season. They called up players from Triple-A, but it wasn’t the same. While Taylor Jordan and Tanner Roark held things up for the most part, the Nats realized that not having a sixth starter in the lineup killed them, or at least partially. (Not hitting until September also probably hurt.)

This year, they have too many problems with that. There is an argument over who will have the number one slot, but I think everyone knows it’s Strasburg’s to lose. This is the year he needs to prove he is an ace. Gonzalez, Zimmermann and Fister were all very good last year, but the number five slot is a curious thing. Some people say that Taylor Jordan or Tanner Roark should take it, while normal number five Ross Detwiler can move to the bullpen as a power lefty. I disagree, and say keep the National Det in the rotation, and have Jordan and Roark as backup. But it really comes down to what new manager Matt Williams sees in Spring Training.

The Red Sox & Cardinals probably have the best depth with players like Lester, Buchholz, Wainwright and Wacha, and the Tigers have probably have the better rotation, but the depth nor the rotation is as complete for any one of them is as good as the one in our Nation’s Capitol.

However, offseason predictions aren’t always correct. Who had the Red Sox winning the world series last year? (Hint: Literally nobody)

But even with the unreliability of predictions, I still like the Nats’ chances.

September is going to be wild

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Playoff berths. Division titles. Tension. Wild Card races. Batting title races.

All those only can all happen in one month. September.

We’re fast approaching the best month of the regular season, and this one is looking stacked with story lines. Wild Card races are much tighter than usual, some divisions will go to the final day, and a race for stats are just some of the big things that will happen. Here are my top ten stories going into the month.

10. The Braves’ fairytale season – will it continue into the postseason?

The Braves have had a season to remember, and are pretty much a lock to win the NL East. However, there are some lingering questions entering the final month of the regular season and looking to October. Injuries have started to show up, with players like Tim Hudson and Jason Heyward both hurt, as well as many more. It won’t be enough to get the Nats past them, but it raises worries for the Atlanta faithful, especially after a dominant series win by St. Louis a few days ago.

9. The AL West

This, once again, is a two team race. Once again, the Rangers have the better record, and have 2.5 games on the A’s. The season doesn’t end with them playing each other, but unless one team goes crazy, it might as well be that. I honestly don’t know who will take this, and is one of the most underrated stories this year.

8. Biogenesis and A-Rod

It’s the problem that was revealed in January, then confirmed in July. Many players have already admitted to it, like Ryan Braun, or haven’t protested it. (Props to the Brewers for giving his salary back to the fans). However, A-Rod, being A-Rod, protested his ruling. Nobody believes him anymore. So when he finally gets his ruling, it’s going to be a victory for every baseball fan.

7. Chris Davis and the search for 60

Chris Davis can still get 60 home runs. That is still completely possible. However, there are a couple questions with that. After slugging 37 in the first half of the season, while still producing hits and runs, is (in comparison) in a home run slump. However, the magic number, 60, is still possible. It would be extremely hard, hitting 13 home runs in a month or so. It has been done before, but the home run category, the only one Miguel Cabrera doesn’t have, would hold him from the triple crown. (More on that later).

6. The (possibly) late surging Nats

At the beginning of August, everyone who picked the Nats for the world series was pretty down. It didn’t look like they would even make the playoffs this year. However, after salvaging one from the Braves, the Nationals have won 7 of their last 9, and are starting to gain ground on the wild card. They have a cushy schedule until the end, with two must win series against the Cardinals and Diamondbacks. It would require one NL Central team to lose their spot (in all likelihood, the Reds). They are running out of time, but the Nats are starting to look like the team they were predicted to be.

5. The Red Sox – what changed?

This year, I don’t expect a meltdown from the Red Sox. And I’ll tell you why. They haven’t been amazing, like the Dodgers. They’ve been consistently good, sometimes great, but usually, just good. Which means they haven’t truly peaked yet. But the question I’ve had this whole season, is what changed? And here’s what I basically got it down to. They brought in clubhouse guys, and really only retained the players who were good guys. The new atmosphere created chemistry that simply wasn’t there in 2011. Now, I’m not saying they didn’t overpay for some of these guys, but it worked. This team is as much of a group of idiots as there was in 2004. Plus, the fans are back in it. Chants and general happiness are propelling the fans, and the Red Sox are playing better than ever. And really, that’s what matters.

4. The AL/NL Wild Card Race

This is possibly the best wild card race I have seen ever. In the AL, everything is insanely close, and no team is ever out. 4 teams are less than 7 back, and you never know what could happen. It’s just so much fun to watch, and not to mention some teams might move into the division lead…. it gets better every day. In the NL, it’s pretty much down to 4 teams.  A NL Central team, the Reds, the D-Backs, and the Nats. Some teams look like they might blow it, others are just starting to power full steam ahead – wild card doesn’t get better then this year.

3. The Dodgers’ magical run

It’s kind of ridiculous, isn’t it? They were in a slump. Money wouldn’t win. Then Puig came up, and everything changed. All the sudden, they are the hottest team in all of baseball. Kershaw and the staff have been dominant, the hitters figured things out, and the NL West looks like a guarantee. The run has been just win after win after win. While a couple questions linger about Puig and his attitude or if they might collapse, since they might have already hit their peak do linger, but they will most likely make the playoffs, and if they win the whole thing – whoa.

2. The NL Central

When was the last time you saw three teams insanely competitive for one division? Not for a long time, that’s for sure. The Pirates, making their first bid at a division with a winning season since who-knows-when, are the team I want to win it. However, the Cardinals, who somehow are just always in the race are making their case to take the division title. The Reds, the least likely candidate of the three to win the division, still look like they have a chance to take it if they can get a few things going for them. If you don’t have a game to watch one night, than either watch this, or…

1. Miguel Cabrera looking for his second straight Triple Crown

Miguel Cabrera. The first triple crown winner since Carl Yastremski last year, might make history by being the first player to ever win the Triple Crown – in back to back years. He has everything but home runs, where he is 4 back of Orioles slugger Chris Davis. However, if he beats him out, he could also win the even more rare Sextuple crown, which includes HR, Hits, OBP, RBI, Slugging, and Batting Average. The last person to win this was Carl Yastremski – Cabrera would be only the 6th ever. This is history in the making, so if you get a chance to watch, I highly urge you to. Because really, what baseball fan would miss this?