Money money money – why so much?

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ca. 2006 --- LeBron James --- Image by © Anthony Mandler/Corbis Outline In the sports world, one thing is inevitable. Contracts. And contracts lead to agents. And agents lead to money. And to play, there is no way out.

And I think that’s fine. That’s completely normal. For any real job, you sign a contract. But here’s what I don’t get.

LeBron James for the next six years will get a total of roughly 110 million dollars. If I got 150,000 dollars a year in savings after tax, I would need to work 122 years to get it. And if I wanted Pujols money? That’s 169 years. Although it’s really nothing when you are immortal.

So why do we think having a player play a game well is worth 150,000 dollars after getting a hit? I simply don’t get why we have to pay these players so much money!

If the sports world was up to me, I would change a lot of things. (BCS, Playoff formats, money, BCS, BCS, BCS, BCS – did I mention BCS?) But this is the second most puzzling to me. I just can’t grasp how a player could be worth so much money (like A-Rod, and 29 million a year) for playing a game?

Playing a game is tough. It takes a toll on you and your body. But throwing a ball into a net is worth that much? I just don’t get it.

 

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Pujols: The Story Of a Man who left his home

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In November of 2011, Albert Pujols seemed to have everything. Two world series rings, 3 MVP trophies, and a town to love him. As it seems, most people would be happy with that, if not satisfied and ready to call St. Louis home. We all want more though. And he left his fans, his home and his team behind for glitzy L.A. And sure, there is the effect of C.J Wilson and Torii Hunter, but he didn’t join the Angels just for that. He joined it for the money.

As we all feel like, it seemed very LeBron like to join another team even when he has success, fame and fortune. Albert Pujols also wanted a chance to win. But it’s different. Albert left because of money. LeBron had a legit reason to go to Miami – he wasn’t winning championships.

But Albert had just won a world series. He had left his home.

Leaving for money is what it has come down to. Money, money money in the rich man’s world. Many Cardinals fans were dismayed, incredibly shocked, worried. But the fame effects us so we feel as if it’s only money. I don’t know why.

Maybe you get this sense that you can do anything and money is all that matters. Once you get to the point that money is more important than championships, it’s a sad, sad day.