The (Not-so) big three

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Flashback to July 8, 2010. A small boys and girls club hosted one of the most controversial TV specials of all time, the second LeBron said “I’m taking my talents to South Beach and joining the Miami Heat”. That led to a Vegas-Caliber unveiling of Chris Bosh, LeBron James and Dwyane Wade all on the same team. Predictions, (Not one, not two) magazine covers, interviews, fanfare, merchandise, and much more were created and embraced.

Flash forward to June 12, 2011. The Dallas Mavericks took an NBA Finals right in front of all of Miami to see. Bust? It was looking like 2012 was the year instead. The big 3 would prevail, as always.

Flash forward to December 25th, 2011. The NBA was back. Lockout shortened, but back. But this time, it wasn’t around the Heat. It was lob city, New York and other teams sharing the spotlight, and sometimes stealing it from the big three. They were fine, and expected huge seasons from everyone.

Flash forward to June 21, 2012. Turns out, they didn’t need a big three. They just needed a big one, as LeBron led them to a title. But this title didn’t feel too real. The season was a good two months short, and it didn’t seem like domination in the regular season. Some people wouldn’t accept Miami’s championship until they one won in a full season with some domination.

Skip forward exactly one year to today, and we can say this season was dominated by the Miami Heat. Owned by them. But it wasn’t a big three effort. It was LeBron and co. Bosh had a mediocre-at-best season, and Wade was very on and off. Mike Miller and “Birdman” stepped up, along with Ray Allen and Mario Chalmers showing more of an on court presence.

So now, it’s all over. The next NBA game isn’t until October. Which gives us some time to ponder a couple things. First things first, as I said before, this was not a big three performance. It was LeBron and Co. LeBron led the entire team in points, steals, rebounds and assists. His 596 points in the playoffs were second to none anywhere. Bosh performed mediocre, and his point average is steadily decreasing. Wade is seeming older and more injury prone by the day.

This finals has lead people to believe the Heat are the next dynasty. However, I don’t believe that. Why? Because a team simply cannot revolve around a single player. Unless the big three play like they did when they were hired to become the big three, it simply doesn’t work that way. LeBron can’t hold this team up forever, and a huge reason they won was because the supporting cast all stepped up big time. The big three are not being big enough right now for the Heat to become something Jordan-like.

Many people are asking if this team can be compared to the Bulls of the Jordan era. I don’t know if it can. While this team is performing, so much question surrounds them. Will LeBron stay? Will D-Wade retire? Will Bosh step up again? Will Ray Allen leave? Was Miller just a fluke? Is there too much centered around James? Can Birdman play better in the regular season? Is Chalmers good enough? I can think of many more. This team was so dominant this season, but it just doesn’t seem comparable yet. 2 titles. While that’s good, they’re still under the Spurs. LeBron isn’t Jordan yet. He very well can be. But there are simply too many questions around this team.

This team was a guarantee in 2011. They are no longer like that. The only player who is playing like their contract is paying them is LeBron. It’s no longer a matter of dominance. Now, it’s a matter of keeping them at the same level. If somebody slips, that affects everything.

Now don’t get me wrong, the Heat will be sighted in the playoffs many years following this one. LeBron could pass Jordan, but he needs help. Celebrate now Miami about your title. But if you don’t get the people you paid to be big to play like it, watch out. Because I can see Oklahoma City in the horizon.

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LeBron, LeBron, LeBron – ENOUGH!!!!!!!!!!

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I turned on my usual SportsCenter this morning, knowing the Heat had won. There was a segment about LeBron. I was fine with that, as I assumed a lot of attention would be played towards him, winning MVP and all. But as I looked down the SportsCenter sidebar, I saw that the next five segments all had King James’ name in it, and at the top, a memo telling you Dick Vitale would be giving reactions on LeBron’s leading them to the championship. I felt as if I should be singing the song, Di, Di Ainyu, (Which, paraphrased, means, ENOUGH, ENOUGH, ENOUGH ALREADY!!)

The Heat won the NBA Championship. Congratulations Miami, the Heat, LeBron, Chris Bosh and D-Wade. The best team won over the season, and it was a great run. That’s really all there is to say.

 I get the fact LeBron is a great player – he is. He can do things other players take years to develop, but just because he wins a championship doesn’t mean it’s the greatest thing since sliced bread. I get it. He’s been there and failed, he’s a changed man, etc, etc, etc. It’s a great story.
But I feel as if they’re forgetting something – the rest of the team won the championship, too! Usually, when there’s a championship, the first five to ten segments are about the team. This time, the first 7 segments were about LeBron. Only LeBron. LeBron’s press conferences, multiple reporters’ reaction to LeBron’s winning, LeBron interviews, LeBron trophy presentation….
“It’s about darn time”, was what LeBron said in his umpteenth interview when asked what was going through his head when the clock hit 0.00. And I think now that it’s over, it’s about darn time we stop paying so much attention and think so so much about LeBron.

Don’t be too sure about the Heat…

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Okay, remember this?

Now, remember this?

Remember this?

Seems familiar, doesn’t it? Well, the first part does. The Heat are rocking and rolling, dunking, winning, and just seeming like a good team. And then. After doing well in the beginning, they choke at the end. Muff it up. Miss the shot. Ouch.

Right now, the Heat are being lead by James and Wade, winning and overpowering all competition. They look to be a clear contender for the championship, right? And I get that. They have what it takes – at the moment.

Have you ever noticed LeBron James is incredible in the regular season, but he scores around five points less in the playoffs, as well as around 2 more assists in the regular season. You are supposed to get better in the playoffs if you are an MVP. Not worse.

Since he doesn’t, like truly great players do, he will be beaten by Derrick Rose, Carmelo Anthony, Kobe Bryant, and Tim Tebow…. just joking on that last one, but he will get beaten, and he will lose if he can’t change it, since he is basically 33% of the team.

But can he?